CB 399: Next Generation Sequencing Technologies: Principles and Applications Fall 2015

Next Generation Sequencing Technologies:  Principles and Applications

Course Director: Dr. Fred Winston

Curriculum Fellow:  Megan Mittelstadt (megan_mittelstadt@hms.harvard.edu) and Emily Gleason

Traditional capillary sequencing technology using base-specific chain termination by fluorescent di-deoxy nucleotides represents modifications to the original sequencing methodology devised by Sanger and colleagues in the 1970s.  Recent years have seen the development of next generation parallel sequencing technologies that are rapidly replacing older methodologies.  Sequencing by synthesis enables the simultaneous sequence analysis of millions of DNA templates at the same time, or in parallel.  These new approaches allow for DNA sequencing at a markedly faster pace, and often at a much cheaper price, making sequencing projects feasible for an ever-expanding number of researchers.  This nanocourse will explore the methodology and principles behind parallel sequencing technology, and how it measures up to traditional sequencing methods.  A discussion of the services available at the Department of Genetics Biopolymers core facility, including order placement, data output, and turnaround times, will also be included for researchers interested in utilizing these resources.

Lecturers:

  • Chad Nusbaum, Co-director, Genome Sequencing and Analysis program, Broad Institute
  • Peter Park, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital, and HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics
  • Robert Steen, Director, Harvard Medical School Biopolymers Facility

Schedule: 

First Session(open to all without prior registration): Tuesday, October 20th from 10 AM – 1:30 PM
Location: NRB 350

Second Session(limited to registered students): Tuesday, October 27th from 10 AM – 12:30 PM
Location: TMEC 448

***The powerpoints for all three lectures are posted below. Must be logged in to view.***

Assignment- Registered students should prepare a one-page document detailing a research question that could be at least partially answered by next-generation sequencing methods, and how you would propose to use them.  Please send your documents (either Word files or pdf files) to Megan Mittelstadt (megan_mittelstadt@hms.harvard.edu) by 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 25th.  Your proposals will be sent to the course lecturers and registered students prior to the session so everyone can look them over and prepare to discuss them with you.  Please bring a copy of the proposals to the session for your own reference.

DROP DEADLINE: Tuesday, October 13, 2015

 AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL