CB 399: The Microbiome in Health and Disease Spring 2015

The Microbiome in Health and Disease

Course Director: Wendy Garrett
Course Instructors: Wendy Garrett, Curtis Huttenhower, Emily Balskus
Curriculum Fellow: Zofia Gajdos, Zofia_Gajdos@hms.harvard.edu

Interest in host-associated microbial communities has exploded over the past few years, and the roles of the human microbiome in health and disease have emerged as key areas of biological interest. The microbes that live within different body sites and their functions are essential parts of human biology, influencing development, metabolism, the immune system, and overall physiology. Advances in sequencing technology, bioinformatic tools, and chemical biology have resulted in increasingly large and rich data collections.

These are beginning to detail the community structure and biomolecular functions of the microbiota at different human body sites, and they shed light on how microbes may contribute to host tissue and organ function. Functional meta'omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics, glycomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics) are further furnishing insights into how the microbiome may affect and be affected by health status and disease susceptibility. This nanocourse will thus provide an overview of the role of microbiome in health and disease, with a focus on computational biology approaches to the intersection of microbiome, microbial chemistry, and human health as well as the role of the microbiome in the development and function of the immune system.

 

Schedule:

First Session: Thursday, April 9, 2015  1 – 4:30 PM  
Location: TMEC 227

Second Session: Thursday, April 16, 2015  1 – 4:30 PM  
Location: TMEC 324

 

DROP DEADLINE: Thursday, April 2, 2015

 

AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL.