CB 399: Public Health 101: Malaria Summer 2014

Public Health 101: Malaria

Course Instructors: Selina Bopp, PhD; Lauren M. Childs, PhD; Usheer Kanjee, PhD; Katy Shaw Saliba, PhD; Kristen Skillman, PhD; Adam South, PhD

Curriculum Fellow: Zofia Gajdos, PhD

Malaria is a parasitic infectious disease that is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in many parts of the world. Infection in humans is caused by one of five species of protozoa from the genus Plasmodium, which are transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitoes. In this Nanocourse, we will explore the biology of the parasite and vector and discuss the major strategies currently being pursued to control and eliminate malaria: drugs, vaccines and vector control. We will highlight the complexities and challenges facing the malaria research agenda and discuss recent advances in the field.

Outline 

  1. Malaria as a Global Disease
  2. Biology of Plasmodium
  3. Drugs and Drug Resistance
  4. Vaccines
  5. Vector Biology
  6. Theoretical Tools: Genomics and Modeling
  7. Research Gaps and Breakthroughs

Schedule:

First Session: Thursday, July 10, 2014, 1:30pm-4:30pm
Location: FXB 301

Second Session: Thursday, July 17, 2014, 1:30pm-4:30pm
Location: FXB 301

DROP DEADLINE: Thursday, July 3, 2014

 

AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL.