CB 399: Tumor Heterogeneity Spring 2014

Tumor Heterogeneity

Nanocourse Director: Franziska Michor, Kornelia Polyak
Curriculum Fellow: Megan Mittelstadt, megan_mittelstadt@hms.harvard.edu

There is a high degree of diversity within tumors despite a largely monoclonal origin, including differences in cellular morphology, cytogenetics, growth rates, cell products, receptors, and immunological characteristics. Together these factors determine neoplastic development, risk of disease progression, and response to therapies. Recent technological developments such as whole-genome sequencing allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. This nanocourse is designed to provide an introduction and overview of tumor heterogeneity and the current technologies aimed at gleaning multidisciplinary data from tumor populations.

Schedule:

First Session: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 12 – 3 PM
Location: Building C, Cannon Room
 
Second Session: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 12:30 PM – 3 PM
Location: TMEC Building, Room 447

 

 DROP DEADLINE: Tuesday, April 8, 2014

 ***Prepatory readings have been posted. Please login to view.***

 

Day 2: Student Assignment

Part I: Discussion Prompt

How can we identify and target drivers of tumor growth and metastasis in clinical samples and in tumor models? Be prepared to discuss your viewpoints at the start of the second session. (No written submission required.)

Part II: Experimental Design Assignment

All students are required to write and submit a brief (one page, single spaced) research proposal using at least one of the concepts or methods presented on Day 1 of this nanocourse to address a specific biological question. This can be related to your research.

Briefly introduce the question you are trying to answer, your hypothesis, and introduce the model system you are working with. Include 2 or 3 specific aims related to your research question. Be sure to include a synopsis of the methods that you plan to use, their benefits and pitfalls.  You can include general information on how this method is routinely used to answer research questions and then how it specifically addresses your biological question. 

During this second session you will be able to discuss your experimental design with your peers and with the lecturers.  We would like to make this an interactive session – so please ask questions and provide feedback to your fellow students.

DUE NO LATER THAN 9am Monday, 4/21/2014

(by submission to megan_mittelstadt@hms.harvard.edu)

AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL