CB 300: Ciliogenesis and Human Disease Spring 2014

Ciliogenesis and Human Disease

Nanocourse Director: Iain Drummond, Ph.D.
Curriculum Fellow: Henrike Besche, Ph.D., Henrike_besche@hms.harvard.edu

Lecturers: Iain Drummond, Ph.D., Eric Pierce, M.D., Ph.D., Jing Zhou, M.D., Ph.D., Detina Zalli, Ph.D.

 

Cilia are present on almost every cell type in the human body. After years of scientific disregard, the cilium has emerged as a key organelle in numerous physiological and developmental processes. Indeed, it is now clear that the ciliary localization of a variety of receptors, ion channels, and transporter proteins effectively positions the cilium for different types of signalling, including responses to distinct morphogens, hormones or growth factors.  In fact, many key processes that occur during development are coordinated by the cilium. These include cell migration, differentiation and/or re-entry into the cell cycle, specification of the plane of cell division, and apoptosis.

Defects in ciliary assembly and function lead to a wide range of human diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, hydrocephalus and retinal degeneration, collectively known as ciliopathies. Despite the severe nature of many of these diseases, the precise mechanisms underlying primary cilium assembly and operation are still poorly understood.  Indeed, it is now thought that defective ciliary signaling may also be important in cancer.

This nanocourse is designed to provide an introduction and an overview of the ciliogenesis and diseases related to it. By the end of the course students will have a clear idea of what “ciliopathies” are, mechanisms of actions associated with ciliogenesis and the recent molecular tools and advances in molecular biology of primary cilia and ciliopathies.

Information for registered students:

Students that are taking this course for credit will be provided with additional literature by the instructors. Students are asked to prepare a short (1-2 pages) research proposal on one specific problem and then to defend their proposal in form of a short presentation (power point or chalk talk) on the second day of the Nanocourse. Enrollment limit for this class is 9 students.

Timeline-
Tuesday, Jan 28 – 1st day of class
Friday, Jan 31st – submit proposal
Tuesday, Feb 4th – students receive written feedback on proposal
Friday, Feb 7th - presentation of research proposal

 

Schedule:

First Session: Tuesday January 28, 2014, 11:30 AM – 3:30 PM
Location: Cannon Room
 
Second Session: Friday February 7, 2014, 10 AM – 1 PM
Location: TMEC 425

 

 DROP DEADLINE: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

 

AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL