CB 399:The Microbiome in Health and Disease Fall 2012

Intellectual Unit:

The Microbiome in Health and Disease
Nanocourse Faculty: Wendy Garrett, Curtis Huttenhower, and Peter Turnbaugh
Curriculum Fellow: Zofia Gajdos (zofia_gajdos@hms.harvard.edu)

Interest in host-associated microbial communities has exploded over the past few years, and the roles of the human microbiome in health and disease have emerged as key areas of biological interest. The microbes that live within different body sites and their functions are essential parts of human biology, influencing development, metabolism, the immune system, and overall physiology. Advances in sequencing technology and bioinformatic tools have resulted in increasingly large and rich data collections.

 These are beginning to detail the community structure and biomolecular functions of the microbiota at different human body sites, and they shed light on how microbes may contribute to host tissue and organ function. Functional meta'omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics, glycomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics) are further furnishing insights into how the microbiome may affect and be affected by health status and disease susceptibility. This nanocourse will thus provide an overview of the role of microbiome in health and disease, with a focus on computational biology approaches to the intersection of microbiome function and human health, the role of the microbiome in immune system development, and microbiota function in drug metabolism.

 

Schedule:

First Session: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 2-5 PM
Location: Armenise Bldg, (D) Amphitheater
 
Second Session: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 2-5 PM
Location: TMEC Building, Room 333

 

Student Assignment:

For all registered students taking this course for credit, small groups (2-4 persons, depending on enrollment) will prepare a presentation describing a proposal that addresses the function of the microbiome in health and disease. Proposals will be presented on day2 of the nanocourse and should aim to address key issues and challenges in the field of microbiome studies. Presentations should focus on experimental design and approach in answering a research question. Participants should come prepare to discuss their peers’ presentations. This proposal must be presented on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 in order to receive full credit.

 

DROP DEADLINE: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 

 

AUDITORS (Post-Docs, Faculty, or Staff) DO NOT NEED TO SIGN UP TO ATTEND THE 1st SESSION.  PLEASE DO NOT ENROLL.